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We use direct actions to interrupt the status quo and bring awareness to key issues and different forms of state violence affecting the root causes of the plight of black and brown people around the world.,

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We stand against the many forms of state violence: police killings, mass incarceration, poverty and others.  We stand for justice for Tony Robinson and ALL Black lives lost at the hands of the state. We stand for community and self determination. We will not stop until we are free.

Lew Blank

YGB raising awareness and building community

Lew Blank

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Dear YGB Community,

 

According to YGB co-founder Brandi Grayson, there is currently a Black woman with three children who had undergone physical, mental, and emotional abuse, which forced her to go into hiding. We’re keeping her anonymous for her protection.

 

Although she has been able to temporarily find safe housing and employment, without your help, she could be unable to pay her rent in the coming weeks while she awaits her first paycheck.

 

This Black mother’s rent is $945 a month, and she also has to pay $100 a week for daycare for her children, plus a $125 enrollment fee. These are expenses that she cannot currently meet, and due to no fault of her own, she may be faced with eviction in the coming weeks.

 

We cannot allow this Black mother to be evicted. Please click here to donate to a GoFundMe to help her with her rent.

 

In addition to this woman, Brandi Grayson is also in contact with two other families in desperate need of funds, both of which have received eviction notices from their landlords.

 

If the GoFundMe does not reach a total of $2,600, it could result in the eviction of these women and families of color.

 

These families are in urgent need of relief. Please click here to donate to a GoFundMe to make sure these people don’t get evicted.

 

Everyone in this country deserves the right to a decent, stable home. Unfortunately, many impoverished people - specifically women of color - face eviction at absurdly high rates, depriving them of the opportunity to attain a stable financial situation and live a decent life.

 

Everyone in Madison should be able to live without fear of eviction, and no one should be forced to live on the streets.

 

It is absolutely integral that we raise as many funds as possible for these women and families of color. Please click here to give them this vital support.

 

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In order to make any progress, we have to Build our collective understanding and Build collective analysis to advocate for better collaborative solutions.

 

You can help by Joining our Coalition of Supporters, or by donating here.

 

If you have any personal stories of racial violence to share, please reach out to us at YGB by sending us a Facebook message or emailing us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Many of us may assume that lead poisoning in children is a thing of the past, a historic phenomenon that disappeared when lead paint was banned in 1978. At the very least, we would assume that lead contamination is confined to cities like Flint, Michigan, which have been widely exposed to the public for the high levels of lead in their water.

 

But what’s truly jaw-dropping is the fact that the state of Wisconsin has an almost identical rate of lead poisoning to that of Flint, Michigan. That’s right: our beautiful state, with pristine bike paths and modern architecture, has Flint-like levels of lead poisoning - and it affects children of color the most.

 

While Flint has a 4.9% rate of lead poisoning for children under the age of six, the state of Wisconsin’s rate is 5%.

 

Even worse, this epidemic of lead poisoning is heavily disparate between white and Black children in Wisconsin. While white children under six in Wisconsin have a 2.8% lead poisoning rate, the rate of lead poisoning for Black children under six in Wisconsin is a whopping 13.2%.

 

That’s right: more than one in ten Black children under six in Wisconsin has dangerous levels of lead in their bloodstreams!

 

A major reason that Black children are more likely to be affected by lead poisoning than their white peers is that poor kids - who are disproportionately people of color - are more likely to be contaminated with dangerous levels of lead than wealthier ones.

 

For instance, across Wisconsin, children under six who receive Medicaid are three times more likely to be affected by lead poisoning than those who don’t receive Medicaid. This is primarily because low-income families are less likely to have their water, paint, and piping adequately inspected and updated, and have more trouble affording treatment.

 

The economic disparity is so bad that two thirds of children on Medicaid in Wisconsin have not even been tested for lead poisoning in the first place. This is a failure on the part of our government to ensure that every child is tested for lead poisoning, something that is required by federal law.

 

This epidemic of lead poisoning has devastating effects on children in Wisconsin. Lead in the bloodstream has been statistically correlated with intellectual and learning disabilities, lower IQ, behavioral issues, diminished brain development, miscarriages, aggression, school suspension, and juvenile incarceration.

 

This is yet another reminder that racial disparities are not just a matter of fairness - they are a matter of success or failure, happiness or depression, and even life or death.

 

You’d think that the fact that Wisconsin has similar levels of lead poisoning to those of Flint would be a top story for the news media and would be a major priority for our state and local governments. Instead, however, our representatives are sitting idly by and are not taking the necessary steps to combat the problem.

 

For example, Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett’s proposal to combat lead poisoning would take “several decades to complete” and would only fund “up to 700 full lead lateral replacements out of the known 68,300 residential lead pipes that pose a health risk to the public.” In other words, the plan solves just 1% of the problem, and will take decades to do so.

 

Surely, when people were concerned about the Ebola outbreak, no one said “let’s wait until 2030 to figure this out.” But when it comes to poor Black children suffering from lead poisoning in Wisconsin, complicity is the norm.

 

A major reason that fixes to lead contamination are not happening is because of money. Fixing lead contamination in Wisconsin alone would cost over a billion dollars, according to some estimates. For this reason, Wisconsin Senate Bill 48, a bill which passed the Wisconsin Legislature on January 23 and was designed to replace lead-contaminated service lines with lead-free ones, deliberately avoided allocating new taxpayer dollars to solving the problem.

 

But while Wisconsin Representatives might be afraid that removing lead contamination would be too expensive, what they fail to recognize is that combatting lead poisoning actually saves money. If we were to eliminate lead poisoning in Wisconsin, it is estimated that our state would save about $28 billion as a result of decreased medical expenses, reduced crime and juvenile delinquency, and increased high school graduation rates, among other factors.

 

It comes down to this: Fear of spending taxpayer dollars to eradicate lead contamination is no excuse for failing to solve Wisconsin’s lead poisoning crisis. Instead of spending money on new police officers and new prisons, we need to be spending our limited dollars on new paint and new pipes, so that children in Wisconsin can truly live up to their full potential.

 

Build the People, Not the Jails!

 

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In order to make any progress, we have to Build our collective understanding and Build collective analysis to advocate for better collaborative solutions.

 

You can help by Joining our Coalition of Supporters, or by donating here.

 

If you have any personal stories of racial violence to share, please reach out to us at YGB by sending us a Facebook message or emailing us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Dear YGB Community,

With the rights of the Dreamers being eroded, a newly-found 27:1 homelessness disparity in Madison, and continued efforts by the Trump Administration to make life even worse for people of color, we need your support now more than ever.

Please show up and show out to a wide range of events this Black History Month! (See Below)


Wisconsin Black Arts Festival 2018
February 2-4 - Wisconsin African American Women’s Center (3020 W Vliet St in Milwaukee)

This week, show your love for Black arts by attending the Wisconsin Black Arts Festival in Milwaukee, featuring dancers, musicians, and spoken word artists of color. For more info, click here.


Hip Hop Benefit Concert
Saturday, February 3 at 7pm - Art In (1444 E Washington in Madison)

The Free the 350 Bail Fund needs all the support it can get. This Saturday, the bail fund will host a local underground hip hop party for people aged 21 and older, with 100% of the proceeds going to the fund. For more information on the event, click here. To donate to the bail fund, click here.


Black History Soiree
Saturday, February 3 at 10pm - Camp Trippalindee (601 Langdon St)

After you’re done with the Hip Hop Benefit Concert, head over to Camp Trippalindee to celebrate Black History Month with drinks. For more info, click here.


Do It Like Durham! Discussion with Takiyah Thompson
Sunday, February 4 at 2pm - 2146 E Johnson St

This Sunday, join Takiyah Thompson - one of the first eight activists arrested in the Durham protests last year to remove a Confederate statue - to discuss how to combat white supremacy. For more info, click here.


Social Justice in Religion and Secularism
Thursday, February 6 at 6:30pm - UW Memorial Union (800 Langdon St)

On Tuesday, the Center for Religion will discuss the intersections between social justice, religion, and secularism. For more info, click here.


Black Voices - Black History Month Wednesdays
Wednesday, February 7 at 6pm - Urban League (2222 S Park St)

Black Voices - Black History Month Wednesdays will kick off on February 7 to celebrate historical Black poetry, including Langston Hughes, W.E.B. DuBois, Ralph Ellison, Gwendolyn Brooks, and Maya Angelou. For more info, click here.


Black and Brilliant 2018
Thursday, February 8 at 11am - Madison College (1701 Wright St)

This event, hosted by the Madison College Black Student Union, will showcase Black participation in the political process, featuring guest speakers and lunch. For more info, click here.


Ambition - Black Women’s Leadership Accelerator 
Friday, February 9 at 7am - Urban League (2222 S Park St)

Every month from February to October, on the second Friday of the month, the Black Women’s Leadership Accelerator will be held, which will help Black women to excel in their professional careers. For more info, click here.


Free Screening of Hidden Figures
Tuesday, February 13 at 5:30pm - Marquee Theater at Union South (1308 W Dayton St)

On February 13 at Union South, watch a free screening of “Hidden Figures”, a film about three women of color who worked for NASA, followed by a talkback on the underrepresentation of women of color in STEM fields. For more info, click here.


In Conversation with Lena Waithe
Tuesday, February 13 at 6:30pm - Union South (1308 W Dayton St)

For Black History Month, Emmy Award winning screenwriter, producer, and actress Lena Waithe will deliver a keynote speech, addressing cultural sensibilities and challenging audience to think outside of conventional norms. For more info, click here.


Milwaukee Redlining with Reggie Jackson
Tuesday, February 13 at 7pm - Jewish Museum Milwaukee (1360 N Prospect Ave in Milwaukee)

This event on February 13, led by historian Reggie Jackson, will explain Milwaukee’s long history of racist redlining practices in the first part of a three part series. For more info, click here.

The second part of the series, which will feature a documentary and a lecture from former Milwaukee Urban League President and CEO Ralph Hollman, will be held at the same time and same place exactly one week later. 


The Blood is at the Doorstep
Sunday, February 18 at 7pm - Varsity Theatre (1326 W Wisconsin Ave in Milwaukee)

This event will show a documentary about a family’s fight for justice for Dontre Hamilton, who was shot 14 times by the Milwaukee Police in 2014. A talkback will follow the screening. For more info, click here.


Hidden Impact of Segregation
Thursday, February 22 at 6:30pm - Progressive Baptist Church (8324 W Keefe Ave in Milwaukee)

This event in Milwaukee, featuring Reggie Jackson and hosted by the Progressive Baptist Church in Milwaukee, will discuss the effects of segregation as part of the church’s Black history program. For more info, click here.


Ball & Chain: A Play by Tiffany Ike
Thursday, February 22 at 7pm - Union Wisconsin Room at UW Milwaukee Student Union (2200 E Kenwood Blvd in Milwaukee)

“Ball & Chain” is a play about Blackness and masculinity, told through the narrative of basketball phenom Deandre Washington. For more info, click here.


Word Power Youth Open Mic & Poetry Slam
Friday, February 23 and 30, at 6pm - Goodman Community Center (149 Waubesa St)

This open mic and poetry slam will feature youth between ages 13 and 19 sharing their poetry, music, and moves! For more info, click here.


Social Justice Leadership Retreat
February 23-25 - Green Lake Conference Center

This three day conference held by the UW Madison Multicultural Student Center will take 60 students and 10 facilitators to the Green Lake Conference Center to discuss identity, allyship, privilege, and leadership. To apply or learn more, click here.


Free Screening of The 13th Hosted by MUM
Monday, February 26 at 5pm - Marquee Theater at Union South (1308 W Dayton St)

On February 26 at the Union South, enjoy a screening of “The 13th”, a groundbreaking documentary that covers America’s racist mass incarceration system. For more info and registration, click here.


Whose Streets?
Wednesday, February 28 at 6pm - UW Milwaukee Union Cinema (2200 E Kenwood Blvd in Milwaukee)

On the last day of February, join UW Milwaukee to watch the documentary “Whose Streets?”, which provides an account of the uprising in Ferguson told by the people who lived it. For more info, click here.



In order to make any progress, we have to Build our collective understanding and Build collective analysis to advocate for better collaborative solutions.

You can help by Joining our Coalition of Supporters, or by donating here.

If you have any personal stories of racial violence to share, please reach out to us at YGB by sending us a Facebook message or emailing us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

This Monday, the Senate approved a bipartisan deal to end the government shutdown until February 8. Despite the bill doing absolutely nothing to protect the Dreamers from deportation, 31 of the 49 Senate Democrats - including Wisconsin Senator Tammy Baldwin - voted for it, allowing it to be signed into law by President Trump.

 

From the get-go, the Democrats’ plan was to not approve a single spending bill unless protections for the Dreamers were explicitly included in it. If the Democrats were strong and persistent - if they actually refused to vote for any bill that didn’t protect the Dreamers -  this strategy could have forced the GOP to cave in to their demands, as it would have extended the shutdown to a point where it would have damaged their favorability.

 

Instead, however, the Democratic Party defaulted on their promise and voted for a bill that gave absolutely no guarantee of protecting the Dreamers. Although McConnell said he would protect DACA recipients - words that he could flip-flop on when it comes time to vote, considering the vague words of his statement - both Trump and Paul Ryan have not yet committed to defending DACA. In the words of Representative Ro Khanna, this lack of commitment from the President and the Speaker of the House makes the deal essentially “meaningless.”

 

While the spending bill does indeed keep the government operational for the coming weeks, it is not worth the sacrifice of the right of hundreds of thousands of DACA recipients to stay in the country they know and love. Bipartisanship and the passage of legislation are important goals, but not when it comes to deporting up to 800,000 immigrants who are just as American as we all are.

 

The last thing we need is for the party of “opposition” and “resistance” to lack any grit in defending hundreds of thousands of innocent people from deportation. Even if they thought it would be a politically smart move, when people’s lives are on the line, taking the easy route is never an acceptable option.

 

What can be done to protect the Dreamers? It won’t help everybody, but one small way to help is to sign this petition to defend Ravi Ragbir, a Green Card holder being threatened with deportation.

 

In the long term, however, we have to Build our collective understanding and Build collective analysis to advocate for better collaborative solutions.

 

You can help by Joining our Coalition of Supporters, or by donating here.

 

If you have any personal stories of racial violence to share, please reach out to us at YGB by sending us a Facebook message or emailing us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

On January 12, Madison Mayor Paul Soglin announced his candidacy for Wisconsin governor, entering a crowded field of candidates seeking the party’s nomination to run against Scott Walker.

 

Soglin has been widely criticized by the left for his shortcomings on eradicating police brutality, alleviating poverty, and fighting for racial and criminal justice. Can we really expect the mayor of one of the most racially disparate cities in the country - a city where Black children are 13 times more likely to be in poverty than their white peers - to truly represent his constituents of color?

 

Matthew Braunginn, one of the founders of YGB, explained this perfectly to the Badger Herald: “As the single largest budget item, what’s really missing is the support of divestment and community investment policies. Even Chief [Mike] Koval has admitted more police don’t solve the underlying problems, only direct community investment and other anti-poverty measures will. So why keep investing in ideas that don’t work?”

 

Soglin has failed to divest from the police, invest heavily in alleviating poverty, or radically change our racist incarceration system. We don’t need governors like Soglin - we need leaders who can adequately address racial injustice and state violence and fight for the needs of people of color.

 

In order to make any progress, we have to Build our collective understanding and Build collective analysis to advocate for better collaborative solutions.

 

You can help by Joining our Coalition of Supporters, or by donating here.

 

If you have any personal stories of racial violence to share, please reach out to us at YGB by sending us a Facebook message or emailing us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

An anonymous source has informed YGB that a Black teenager is being charged with two Class C felonies for engaging in consensual sex last October.

 

On October 17, the source’s cousin, an 18 year old Black teenage male, was engaging in consensual sex with a mixed race young lady under the impression that she was a legal adult as well. While the two were together in the car, the police pulled up and asked them for their ages. Both said “18” and respectfully complied with the officer’s orders.

 

According to our source, the officer proceeded to interrogate the young lady’s mother, who lived on that block. She informed the police officer that her daughter was below the age of 18, meaning that the two teenagers had technically committed “statutory rape” despite the exchange being consensual.

 

Although the teenager didn’t know the young lady was under 18 and the act was entirely consensual, the Waukesha Police Department proceeded to charge him with a Class C felony for “Second Degree Sexual Assault of Child.”

 

The teenager is currently out on bail but is at risk of being ruled a felon in the coming months, which could severely damage his future.  This is in spite of the fact that the young lady’s mother, recognizing the teenager did nothing harmful, has called for the police department to drop the case.

 

Now, why is this an issue? The law is the law, right? Well, the enforcement of statutory rape laws in Wisconsin is heavily racist. According to a 2014 study, Black offenders made up 25% of those charged with statutory rape in Wisconsin, despite Black people making up only 6% of our state’s population. It’s well known that crimes are committed proportionally across races - which means that the percentage of offenders who are Black should be closer to 6%. However, Black people in Wisconsin are about five times more likely to be incarcerated for statutory rape than their white counterparts. Something's not right here.

 

To no surprise, when asked if she thought racism was involved, our source responded “completely.”

 

Wisconsin’s statutory rape laws, which are some of the strictest in the nation, appear to be yet another way for our state to lock more people of color behind bars for doing nothing wrong. This sheds a painful light on the need to reassess our approach to underaged sex in a way that doesn’t jeopardize the futures of our children.

 

In order to make any progress, we have to Build our collective understanding and Build collective analysis to advocate for better collaborative solutions.

 

You can help by Joining our Coalition of Supporters, or by donating here.

 

If you have any personal stories of racial violence to share, please reach out to us at YGB by sending us a Facebook message or emailing us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Dear YGB Community,

This Thursday, Attorney General Jeff Sessions and the Trump Administration expanded the racist War on Drugs. The Justice Department accomplished this by allowing prosecutors to enforce federal marijuana criminalization laws in states that have already legalized the drug. This decision is a major blow to the marijuana legalization movement, and will effectively incarcerate even more people of color.

We absolutely MUST resist Trump’s racist agenda. You can help by Joining our Coalition of Supporters, or by donating here.

In addition, please show up and show out to the upcoming events below!


Black Women’s Wellness Talk
Saturday, January 7 at 2pm - Barnes and Noble at East Towne Mall (1 E Towne Mall)

Start the New Year by joining the Foundation for Black Women’s Wellness to discuss how to optimize the health of women of color. For more info, click here.


8 More Police Officers?
Monday, January 8 at 4:30pm - City-County Building (210 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd) Room 354

We already have too many cops in Madison, and the MPD is trying to add eight more. On Monday, the Finance Committee will be debating whether or not to hire these eight cops, and we must attend the committee’s meeting to pressure our representatives to stop over-policing our neighborhoods! For more info, click here.


Inclusive Leadership Workshop
Wednesday, January 10 at 9:30am - DreamBank (1 N Pinckney St)

This session will explain how to foster an inclusive work culture, and how such an environment can promote equality, diversity, and success. For more info, click here.


MLK Free Community Dinner
Friday, January 12 at 4:30pm - UW Gordon Commons (770 W Dayton St)

For the MLK holiday weekend, enjoy a buffet dinner and a performance by Madison Music Makers to celebrate the legacy of Martin Luther King. For more info, click here.


34th Annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Birthday Celebration
Sunday, January 14 at 1pm - Marcus Center for the Performing Arts (929 N Water St in Milwaukee)

Only two cities have celebrated MLK’s birthday annually since 1984: Atlanta and Milwaukee. Keep Milwaukee’s tradition alive by joining this celebration of his legacy through the mediums of art, speech, and writing. For more info, click here.


Martin Luther King Day Celebration 2018
Monday, January 15 at 9am - Milwaukee Public Library (310 W Locust St in Milwaukee)

On MLK Day in Milwaukee, meet at the library for a full day of activities to honor Martin Luther King, including poetry, music, dance, crafts, and games. For more info, click here.


33rd Annual Madison-Dane County King Holiday Observance
Monday, January 15 at 5pm - Overture Center (201 State St)

To celebrate MLK day, enjoy a freedom sing-in, award show, and a series of speeches to remember King. Featured speakers include Mayor Soglin and Frank Humphrey, President of the NAACP Wisconsin State Conference. For more info, click here.


Women’s March WI Anniversary Day of Action
Saturday, January 20 at 10am - Milwaukee County Courthouse (901 N 9th St in Milwaukee)

To celebrate the one year anniversary of the original Women’s March, we will march on January 20 in Milwaukee to advocate against Trump’s bigoted agenda. For more info, click here.


Hidden Voices: African American Writers in Wisconsin
Saturday, January 20 at 1pm - Friends of Lakeview Library (2845 N Sherman Ave)

This event will bring together three prominent Madison-area writers of color - Fabu, Sherry Lucille, and Catrina Sparkman - to share poetry, prose, and drama that will shed light on what it means to be Black in Wisconsin today. For more info, click here.


MLK Day 2018: Defining Character Through Service and Justice
Monday, January 22 at 3pm - Memorial Union (800 Langdon St)

To honor MLK, a special event will be held on the UW campus that will offer a free dinner, social justice art, student speakers, and conversations on diversity and service. For more info and registration, click here.


Madison Area Business Equality Summit
Tuesday, January 30 at 1pm - American Family Insurance (6000 American Parkway)

On January 30, American Family Insurance will host a summit to promote business equality for members of the LGBT community and give participants a chance to network and discuss issues of LGBT economic empowerment. For more info, click here.


We cannot build this movement without your support. You can help by Joining our Coalition of Supporters, or by donating here.

If you know of any events for January that we missed, please reach out to us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

We are all aware that Madison’s communities of color are significantly more susceptible to poverty, employment, educational barriers, and incarceration than their white counterparts. But perhaps one of the most severe racial disparities in Madison is the makeup of its homeless population.

 

According to a new city housing report, African-American individuals in families are 27 times more likely than white individuals in families to be homeless. This factor of 27 is the higher than any other type of disparity in Madison, when compared to statistics from the Race to Equity Report.

 

While the disparity in homelessness for Black Madisonians is the worst, such issues exist for all races in our city. Latino individuals in families in Madison are 7 times more likely to be homeless than white ones; for Native Americans, this factor is 15.

 

We must do the work to understand and advocate for the change we need to combat poverty as an expression of racism and state violence. You can help by Joining our Coalition of Supporters, or by donating here.

 

According to Matt Watcher, Madison’s Housing Initiatives Specialist, a major cause of these disparities in homelessness is differences in income. Other contributing factors to these disparities are racial discrimination and Madison’s 11:1 disparity in incarceration for adults, which increase the likelihood of people of color being rejected by employers and landlords due to their criminal records.

 

It will take changes in our economic system, our criminal justice system, our housing system, and our local culture to fix this issue - shifts that are only possible with people power!

 

In order to make any progress, we have to Build our collective understanding and Build collective analysis to advocate for better collaborative solutions.

 

You can help by Joining our Coalition of Supporters, or by donating here.

 

If you have any personal stories of racial violence to share, please reach out to us at YGB by sending us a Facebook message or emailing us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

An incident of racially-motivated violence occurred at the Plan B gay bar early last month.

 

An anonymous contact has told YGB that after a hip hop show on December 1 at Plan B, a man of color was told to leave the bar. He says that he non-violently complied with the request but out of the blue, as he was waiting for his coat, was punched three or four times - not by other customers at the bar, but by the bouncers themselves, the majority of which were white. A man who was passing by later told him that he was thrown on the ground while unconscious and called a “f****** n*****.”

 

The source has told us that the incident has resulted in a concussion, whiplash, a hyperextended knee, anxiety, and trauma. While he says the promoter of the Plan B event has apologized, he’s been denied access to the security camera footage of the incident. YGB contacted Plan B and received no response.

 

It is vital that all establishments in Madison serve as a safe space for people of all colors. What can we do to turn our places into safe spaces?

 

YGB is raising awareness. If you have any personal stories of racial violence to share, please reach out to us at YGB by sending us a Facebook message or emailing us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Despite facing a surge of xenophobia and racist sentiments, Norway has countered its racial problems with significantly more success than we have here in the U.S.

 

Although there has been a rise in bigotry in Norwegian culture, immigrants and people of color have still seen “positive trends in job advancement, entry into universities, and acceptance in Norwegian institutions, even in leadership positions.”

 

How is this possible? What makes Norway so effective at combating racism? Put simply, the Norwegian government has used governmental policies to combat the most systemic manifestations of racism. The Scandinavian country has elevated people of color into high-ranking, high-visibility positions, dispersed immigrants into a variety of cities instead of cramming them into a single ghetto, and economically empowered them with social programs like universal healthcare, universal public college, subsidized housing, and affordable mass transit.

 

We must advocate for the change we need to combat racism and state violence. You can help by Joining our Coalition of Supporters, or by donating here.

 

The takeaway is clear: building economic justice for people of color is one of the most effective ways to mitigate racism. It is vital that the United States takes a page out of Norway’s book.

 

To read more about Norway’s efforts to combat racism, please click here.

 

YGB is raising awareness. If you have any personal stories of racial violence to share, please reach out to us at YGB by sending us a Facebook message or emailing us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

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YGB TO PETITION THE UNITED NATIONS

YGB needs your voice in order to get an investigation by the United Nations as we elevate the conversation of of racial disparities in Madison and fight for justice for Tony Robinson, the unarmed black teen murdered at the hands of officer Matt Kenny of the Madison Police Department  

SIGN THE PETITION HERE SIGN THE PETITION HERE 

FIRE MATT KENNY

YGB demands that Matt Kenny, the murderer of Tony Robinson, be fired. Far to often are killer cops left unpunished, and we want Kenny off the streets.

SIGN THE PETITION TO FIRE MATT KENNY HERE

ABOUT US

The Young Gifted and Black Coalition is a circle of young leaders determined to end state violence and raise the voice of communities of color. We are young Black Women, Queer Folks, Straight Folks and Feminist Men who are fighting for Black Liberation. Our focus is on the low income black communities that our core members call home. 

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